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Cylinder


Cylinder refers to the cylindrical shape inside the engine block. It is the surface on which the piston moves and compresses the air-fuel mixture, measured in centimeters (cm) or inches. It is typically cast iron and very smooth and honed so the piston can move without damaging either surface.

  • The cylinder block is the foundation of the engine. All other engine parts are assembled in or attached to the cylinder block. Most blocks are cast from gray iron or iron mixed with other materials such as nickel and chromium.  Some blocks are cast from aluminum alloy.
  • The block is a casting that has large holes for the cylinder parts. It also contains water jackets and coolant passages. Water jackets are the spaces between the cylinder bores abe the outer shell of the block. Coolant flows through these spaces to pick up heat and carries it away from the engine
  • The core cleanout holes allow the removal of the cores that formed the water jacket. These cores are made of san and shaped like water jackets. They are put into place and hot metal is poured around them After the metal is already cooled and hardened, the cores are broken up and removed through the clean holes. Then the holes are sealed with plugs. These are called core plugs, freeze plugs, or expansion plugs.  If the coolant in the block starts to freeze the coolant will now expand and push the plugs out,m which may give protection against a cracked block. However, a coolant that contains the proper amount of antifreeze will not be likely to get frozen.

Cylinder Head Gasket

 A head cylinder gasket seals the joint between the cylinder head and the cylinder block. The gasket is placed between the head and the block Tightening the head bolts forces the soft material of the head gasket to fill any irregularity.

 Master Cylinder

The brake master cylinder acts like a hydraulic pump that is attached to the pedal. It moves and detaches the brake fluid to the caliper and brakes drums for mechanical work.  The brake master contains two separate systems that usually work over across in case of failure.

Master Cylinder converts force (usually from a driver's foot) into hydraulic pressure. This device controls slave cylinders at the other end of the hydraulic system. When foot pressure is applied to a piston, hydraulic pressure is created to push fluid through lines and wheel cylinders to force brake pads against discs. By pressing the brake pedal, mechanical power is converted into hydraulic power, which slows or stops the vehicle. The brake master cylinder is located in the engine bay near the brake fluid reservoir. The brake fluid reservoir is mounted right above the master cylinder and stores the fluid until the cylinder converts force (usually from a driver's foot) into hydraulic pressure.

This device controls slave cylinders at the other end of the hydraulic system. When foot pressure is applied to a piston, hydraulic pressure is created to push fluid through lines and wheel cylinders to force brake pads against discs. By pressing the brake pedal, mechanical power is converted into hydraulic power, which slows or stops the vehicle. The brake master cylinder is located in the engine bay near the brake fluid reservoir. The brake fluid reservoir is mounted right above the master cylinder and stores the fluid. The brake fluid reservoir is mounted right above the master cylinder and stores the fluid until is needed to apply brake pressure.