VW P0108 Code Manifold Air Pressure (MAP) Barometric Pressure Sensor

Vehicle:   Volkswagen
Difficulty: ⚫⚫⚪⚪⚪
DIY Cost: $15-$40
Est. Time: 30 min - 1 hr

P0108 is a fault code that indicates a probelm with the circuit for the Intake Manifold Air Pressure (MAP) sensor. P0108 code will trigger check engine light if there is a problem with the intake manifold pressure sensor, faulty connector, or damaged wires. 

The two most common problems that trigger check engine light with code P0108 are due to a bad MAP sensor or wiring issue. 

Intake manifold pressure sensor can trigger more than fault code: 

  • P0108 - Manifold absolute pressure (MAP) sensor/barometric pressure (BARO) sensor - high input
  • P007D - Charge error coolant temperature circuit high bank 1

Possible Causes

Manifold Air Pressure (MAP) Barometric Pressure Sensor Circuit High Voltage
  • Faulty manifold pressure sensor
  • Damaged connector for manifold pressure sensor
  • Damaged wires that connect to the manifold pressure sensor
  • Faulty Engine Control Unit (ECU) - Rare

MAP sensor communicates with the ECU. It operates in 5 volt range and not 12 volt.

Symptoms

P0108 Manifold Air Pressure (MAP) Barometric Pressure Sensor Circuit High Voltage Input Problem

A fault MAP sensor can cause a number of issues including: 

  • Check engine light on
  • Rough idle
  • Acelertaion problems
  • Poor fuel economy

How to fix code P0108 

P0108 Fault Code

The video above shows you how to diagnose fault codes P0108. Even though we diagnosed the problem on a 2016 Volkswagen Jetta, the procedure is the same for all cars since P0108 is a generic code.

The location of the MAP sensor will vary but the sensor is usually installed on the intake manifold. 

diagnose p0108 fault code

First, start reading the fault codes using a OBD-II scanner. Connect the scanner to the diagnositc port under the dashboard and read codes from the Engien Control Module (ECM).  

Code P0108 connector problem

Next, locate the connector to the MAP sensor. Unplug it and check it for corrosion. If no corrosion is present, use a digital multimeter to check the voltage to the sensor. With the ignition on you should read around 5 volts. If you get 0 volt at the connector end, there is a wire harness or ECU problem. If you are reading 5 volts, the problem most likely is the sensor itself and needs to be replaced. 

How to replace a MAP sensor

How to replace MAP sensor

Replacing the MAP sensor is a very simple job that in most cases takes less than one hour. 

  1. Park vehicle on level ground.
  2. Allow the engine to cool down. 
  3. Open the hood and secure it open. 
  4. Locate the engine intake manifold. 
  5. Remove air filter housing or any other covers that may be on top of the MAP sensor. 
  6. Unplug the electrical connector from the MAP sensor by pressing on the connector then pulling it away. 
  7. Remove bolts that hold the MAP sensor in place. On a Volkswagen you don't need to remove any screws. Simply press on the locking tabs then pull the sensor. 
  8. Install the new MAP sensor in reverse order. 

Can I drive with a bad MAP sensor? 

While the car will still run even with a bad MAP, we do not recommend driving. Fuel consumption will increase significantly and in some cases the vehicle may get stuck in limp mode, meaning transmission won't shift gears. 

Can a bad MAP sensor throw a code? 

Yes, a bad MAP sensor can throw more than one code: Here are a couple of common fault codes triggered by a bad MAP sensor: 

  • P0108 - Manifold absolute pressure (MAP) sensor/barometric pressure (BARO) sensor - high input
  • P007D - Charge error coolant temperature circuit high bank 1

Can you clean a MAP sensor? 

You can clean a MAP sensor with electric parts cleaner. Cleaning the MAP sensor does not always work. 

By YOUCANIC Automotive Experts
Nov 2020
VW P0108 Code Manifold Air Pressure (MAP) Barometric Pressure Sensor P0108 is a fault code that indicates a probelm with the circuit for the Intake Manifold Air Pressure (MAP) sensor. P0108 code will trigger check engine light if there is a problem with the intake manifold pressure sensor, faulty connector, or damaged wires.